6 Myths You Might Believe about Athlete’s Foot

Wet Footprint on SidewalkIf you are tempted to believe some of the Denver Airport conspiracy theories circulating around, you might also find yourself wondering about things you hear about athlete’s foot. While we are not up on the latest New World Order chatter, we do know a thing or two about feet, and there are some myths about this infection that we’d like to lay to rest:

Myth 1

The sore, itchy rash on my feet is the result of alien invaders. In one way that’s true—they are invaders—but there is nothing alien about them. They are common fungi found all over our world.

Myth 2

I’m not a man and don’t play sports, so I won’t get it. Try telling that to the young woman with red, peeling skin between her toes. It is true men are more susceptible, but anyone who comes in contact with the fungus can develop the condition.

Myth 3

I just need to keep my shoes on and never go barefoot. While not going barefoot may reduce your risk, keeping your feet hot and sweaty in shoes may actually give the fungus its ideal environment.

Myth 4

As long as I shower every day, I’m good. Keeping your feet clean will definitely help, but the microscopic fungus loves damp, warm places, so the shower may actually be a prime place to catch it.

Myth 5

I can get rid of it with vinegar (or tea, bleach, antiseptic mouthwash—you fill in the blank). None of these household products is designed to kill the fungus and will have little effect.

Myth 6

It will go away on its own. This is very unlikely. If your immune system was not strong enough to fight off the infection in the first place, it will need help to get rid of it once it is established.

Myth 7

I don’t need to worry about it in my own house. Unfortunately, if a family member has the infection, or even just carries in the fungus, places in your house can also become a source of infection. That’s why you should never share towels, shoes or socks from an infected person.

Athlete’s foot is nothing to toy around with. If you suspect you have an infection, call Rocky Mountain Foot & Ankle Center at (303) 423-2520, for diagnosis and proper treatment you can believe in.

Photo Credit: Hans via Pixabay.com

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